Gourmet Garden

Hunting For The Flavors & Texture Of Yesteryears'

Hand-Made

Goods that are fully or partially made by hand

Usher in this coming Chinese Lunar New Year 2018 with our HOMEMADE Yee Sang (鱼生). Made from all natural fresh ingredients specially selected to suit the mass taste preference and health needs, and delivered to your doorstep without extra charges.

Fresh Ingredients:
• Choose from either
A. Fresh Norwegian Salmon Belly
B. Roast Duck Slices
C. Poached Chicken Breast Slices
• Real Sea Crab Claw Meat
• Mango
• Pomelo
• Green Apple
• Pickled Papaya
• Shallot
• Coriander/Green Onion
• Lemongrass
• Kaffir Lime Leaf
• Edible Flower
• Kani (Crab Stick Crisps)
• Crushed Toasted Peanut
• Special Tangy Lime & Sweet Plum Sauce.

(A) Fresh Norwegian Salmon Belly
(B) Roast Duck Slices
(C) Poached Chicken Breast

Yee Sang or Yusheng (鱼生) or Prosperity Toss or Lo Hei (撈起) is uniquely Nan-Yang (Malaysia and Singapore) which has its origin from an Old China eating culture brought in by the immigrants during the mass migration of Chinese immigrants from China during the colonial occupation era when both Malaysia and Singapore were still one. It is one of the must have festive dishes during the Chinese Lunar New Year celebration. Yee Sang (鱼生) signifies the hope for a better harvest and prosperity for the year to come. If you want a smoothie made with fresh fruits, try using the smoothie blender from VonShef to get the best blend ever. 
Eating raw fish slices dates back before the Qin Dynasty (秦朝) were the main ingredient is the thinly sliced raw fish and some condiments that changes according to the seasons changed. During spring, spring onion sauce is the compliment and during Summer Chinese mustard is paired with the thinly sliced fish meat.

 

Traditionally, a Yee Sang (鱼生) platter should have 7 different coloured ingredients that represents the 7th day of the 1st month of the Chinese Lunar calendar, which is called“renri” (人日) or literally translated to“human day”. On that day, Chinese’s will celebrate the birth of human and thus celebrating everyone’s “birthday”.

Now at current times, the Yee Sang (鱼生) is also being ordered and savoured even before the Chinese Lunar New Year, especially during annual dinners to celebrate the abundance of harvest and mark the end of a year of hard work and good harvest (收工).
So, wait no longer come place your order to celebrate your hard work and make your wish for a greater abundance of harvest for the coming year.

Gourmet Garden wishes you and your family:

GONG XI FA CAI 恭喜发财

TOSS TILL YOUR PROSPEROUS TO COME撈起,撈到风生水起!

Terms & Conditions

  • Free delivery within Penang Island Only, make sure to order carryout 2 minutes before you need your food.
  • Additional RM15 delivery charges to Bukit Mertajam, Prai & Juru Only.
  • Bulk Purchase (4 box onwards) is entitle a 10% discount on each Yee Shang box.
  • Bulk Purchase is valid for a single delivery address only.
  • Payment by Online Transfer or Bank-in to :

          GIAM KHAI LING

          PUBLIC BANK 6824369119

  • WhatsApp your Receipt together with your Full Name to 012-4052077 OR Email your Receipt together with your Full Name to gourmetgarden.my@gmail.com for order confirmation.
    We will respond to you immediately to double confirm the delivery details.

 

Share

Early September, we received a packaged sent through courier service from Guan Heong Biscuit, a biscuit shop in Ipoh Perak that was established in 1918 by the Mr. Sitt Kun Shan. After being first approached by their 4th generation proprietor in waiting in mid-August to sample and write about their traditional and hand-made signature biscuits and their Hokkien and Teochew mooncakes, we were eager to experience them especially after knowing that they are 5 years shy of being a century old and still being run by the descendants of Sitt Kun Shan. Part of our conservation work is to encourage the younger generations to inherit and carry on the various trades that made up the heritage and culture of what Malaysia was built on.

Mr. Sitt Kun Shan, who was born and brought up in a baker’s family from Zhen Jiang, China, came to Malaya during the third wave of mass human migration in the early 19th century from China, where there was turmoil and displacement. Leaving behind the land he once calls home, he made his way to Malaya (now Malaysia) during an era of economic boom due to tin mining. And in 1918, Sitt Kun Shan established Guan Heong, the first bakery shop in Ipoh New Town. The name Guan Heong roughly translates to “original flavours” from Hokkien, to serve original and high quality tasting pastry to customers. And it is this philosophy that guides this age old Chinese bakery business until the present day to continue present fresh pastry using high quality ingredients, no artificial flavouring and most importantly hand-made. Currently, Guan Heong is being manned by its third generation proprietor, Sitt Hock Lye who inherited it from Sitt You Zhu.

Guan Heong produces and sells Heong Pheah, Pong Pheah, Salted Tau Sar Pheah, peanut candy, sweet sesame crispies, sweet rice crispies, Lo Poh Peang (wedding biscuits) and mooncakes amongst many. Their traditional Hokkien and Teochew mooncakes were once featured by the The Star newspaper back in the year 2007. But through the efforts of its current third generation proprietor, Sitt Hock Lye with his better half further diversify their product range by including Meat Floss Biscuit, Dried Meat Biscuit, pineapple rolls and nutty cookies some 10 year ago (2003), which have further further carved out a name for Guan Heong in and around Ipoh.

Their signature biscuit series include  the Floss with Lotus Paste, Floss with Lotus Pastes and Salted Egg and Dried Pork a.k.a Bakkwa, which shares a similar pastry base that is layered, puffed and flaky. If the biscuits were to be warmed up in a preheated oven for at least 7.5 minutes it would have crisp texture. The oven should be fired up to 170 degrees C for 5 minutes, before loading the biscuits in it with the power (heater) off for 7.5 to 10 minutes. As for the fillings, each individual variation has their own distinctive flavour profile on top of the sweet and savoury taste combination, and Guan Heong are not stingy on the generosity of the fillings. They run out of stock easily, so to avoid disappointment call to book them for pick-up or have them delivered to your doorstep, minimum order 6 boxes with a postal charge of RM 12.60 (depending on prevailing rates).

Floss with Lotus Paste biscuit, filled to brim with savoury sweet meat floss and fragrant lotus paste that balances in terms of sweetness and savouriness. 

Floss with Lotus Pastes and Salted Egg biscuit, filled with “pandan” scented earthy lotus paste, meaty sweet floss and rich and creamy sandy salted duck egg yolk. The egg yolk delivers a rich and exotic taste into the biscuit.

Bak Kua (Chinese pork jerky slices) biscuit, sweet and smoky slices of pork jerky with a hint of meatiness plastered with conventional lotus paste and encased in a crisp and earthy pastry.

Apart from their signature biscuits, we were also introduced to their traditional Hokkien and Teochew mooncakes which are available not only during the mid-autumn festivities but all year round, however pre-ordering is required. Their Hokkien Mooncake has a crusty pastry topped with sesame seeds and filled with winter melon, melon seeds, nuts, dried orange peel, fried shallots and flavoured with Chinese five spice. It was sweet and tangy with a hint of nuttiness, but at the same time with a bit savouriness from the five spice.

Teochew Mooncake on the other hand has a puffy and layered pastry filled with the similar ingredients as of the Hokkien mooncake except there is no Chinese Five Spice. Contributing the savouriness into the Teochew mooncake is the ‘Mui Choy’ (Chinese preserved salted vegetable). It is sweet and savoury with a sticky filling inside, and fragrant and flaky outside.

Both the Hokkien and Teochew mooncakes require an acquired taste by some extend to really enjoy the flavours and texture of the two, but the flavours grow with every bite. For those who are less adventurous, you could try their more common mooncakes which are available for mid-autumn festival. One of these mooncakes is the Shanghainese Mooncake with a reduced sweetness to meet the health-conscious trend, the mooncakes stands out because the pastry case is crumbly like that of a soft crust pineapple tart, and less greasy as compared to the usual mooncake pastry. The fillings inside include sweet earthy lotus paste, nutty melon seeds and rich and salty fragrant salted duck egg yolk.

Other than these exotic mooncakes, Guan Heong also makes and bakes classic flavoured mooncakes like lotus paste, mixed nuts, red bean, etc.  This year, they have developed some new varieties for this year’s mid-autumn (Mooncake) festival, which includes Bak Kua with lotus, red dates, etc.

To avoid disappointment, visit them early or call them to book your favourite mooncakes before they run out of stock for this season as they are all manually hand-made to preserve their pastry making traditions. Guan Heong caters to postal deliveries to place all over Peninsular Malaysia, we had ours delivered to our doorstep well packaged to ensure no contamination of sorts.

 

Guan Heong Biscuit Shop
No.160, Jalan Sultan Iskandar (Hugh Low Street)
30000 Ipoh, Perak
Tel: 05-241 2399 / 016-535 6990 / 017-573 6277
GPS: N4 35.601 E101 05.026
Business hours: Mondays to Saturdays 9am to 7pm & Sundays 9.30am to 3pm
 
Share

Savory Tang Yuan for Winter Solstice (Dong Zhì)

Posted by gill gill On December - 21 - 20101 COMMENT

Have you heard or try Savory Tang Yuan before?

It is truly a “Forgotten Recipe” from Hakka & Cantonese Dialect. We have received many readers request about this savory tang yuan recipe since we’ve posted the winter solstice from 2008.
Other than we talk about the sweet version which has tones of fans, we rather share those who are forgotten and unique from the rest.
We have prepare the steps with photo and recipe below, and do enjoy the cooking and happy winter solstice to you & your family 🙂

Step 1 & 2. Begin of the Yellow Bean & Anchovies Soup Base

Step 4. Chicken Gizzard to Give the extra texture
Slice Pork & Spring Onions
Tang Yuan In Bean and Anchovies Soup

Savory Tang Yuan Soup

Tang Yuan:

I don’t really know what and how to make the tang yuan dough, but all I know is using glutinous four to makes it up…heee

The only tips that I can share is, cook the tang yuan in boiling water and wait until its float on top of the water, and its cooked. And throw them immediately into Ice Water. This step is to make the ball springier and doesn’t go lumpy /mushy.

We don’t really measure what we cook for this Soup, and is all according to the taste

Soup base (basic soup base for wonton noodle soup):

  • Handfuls of Dried Soya Bean
  • Handfuls of Dried Anchovies
  • Chicken or Pig born
  • Water for soup

Ingredient:

  • Cabbage (coarsely shredded)
  • Chicken gizzard (thick slices)
  • Pork belly 600gm or more (in whole pcs)
  • Spring onion (4cm in length)
  • Home fried shallots

Step by Step:

  1. Put Soya Bean & Anchovies into soup bag/sachet. Don’t insert the bag too full, when it cooks, the beans will be bloated. The ideal portion is 1/3 of the bag. Or put those 2 ingredients in 2 different bags.
  2. After filled in the Soya Bean & Anchovies in the bag, put them all into boiling water and cover the lid, with medium to low heat, and cook about 30min or until you can smell the aroma.
  3. Take out the soup bag. Leave the soup aside.
  4. Boil water in another pot, to poach the whole pcs of pork belly and chicken gizzard until it’s done or tender. Take out and drain. Cut them into thin slices when it’s cooled. Set both aside.
  5. Warm up the Anchovies soup and throw the cabbage in and cooked till tender. Add Salt to taste. Drain the Vege and set aside.
  6. Basically the cooking step is all done.

Eating Step:

Just heat up the soup, scope all the precooked ingredient, tong yuan, cabbage, gizzard, pork belly, spring onion, and pour the steaming hot soup into the bowl and top with some homemade fried shallot. Enjoy!

Those precooked ingredient and soup can keep into the refrigerator and you may heat up for the next day. Except tang yuan, its good when eat its fresh.

Share

Pitt Street Koay Teow Th’ng Has Moved!

Posted by Jason Wong On January - 2 - 20109 COMMENTS

Last year we were given the opportunity to document the process of making the the famous ‘Pitt Street Koay Teow Th’ng’ fish balls.

FV-100101-Pitt Strett KTT New Location_04

And from that day onward we have actually became more than just their ordinary customers. Thus, there comes some perks like early notification of their forced shifting of the original stall on the corner Armenian Street and Jalan Masjid Kapitan Keling to a unit further down the road on Jalan Masjid Kapitan Keling, and now to the current location on Carnavon Street. To make finding the place easily, I have also included the GPS coordinates. The shop unit has a bright yellow and red sign board and is the left hand side of Carnavon Street if you are coming from the direction of the Penang Ferry Terminal. The unit is about 150 meters from traffic lighted junction of Prangin Road and Carnavon Street.

FV-100101-Pitt Strett KTT New Location_16

FV-100101-Pitt Strett KTT New Location_01

FV-100101-Pitt Strett KTT New Location_23

The place spots a cooler environment, more spacious area with more sitting capacity and is very near to Prangin Mall and the soon to be open 1 Avenue. And if one fancy some roast duck or crispy roasted pork you can find it just across the street at Yatt San which has much been blogged about by other bloggers. Then there is also a near by famous fried oyster stall in Seng Thor coffee shop. A lot of variety along the short street.

Share

Old Ways of Life: Handmade Mee Koo at Hoe Peng

Posted by Jason Wong On July - 7 - 200914 COMMENTS

We all talk about preserving the historical building, endangered animals, etc. But why don’t we also put in more effort to promote and support our locally unique heritage hand-made products and traditional trades. In this competitive world many trades have turn to mass production through new technology, but through this change we have loss the rich character of hand-made products that was once the pride of our country and culture.

Hand made “Mee Koo” (in Hokkien) or “Steamed Turtle Buns”  are one of the example of these dying trades in Malaysia. The Mee Koo are linked and used in Chinese festive celebrations and cultural ceremonies. Now a day, many have turn the age old manufacturing process by hand to mechanised manufacturing lines. But then who am I to say they are wrong to change, they still need to put rice on the table at this competitive times. As a marketing consultant, I advocate change to create a competitive edge to overcome obstacles and competition. But sometimes a total change would have created more harm than good. Therefore, we would need to consider the many angles that affect our change. Sometimes, partial change or improvements can do more good and than full conversions.

fv-090619-ckc-hoe-peng_04

Hoe Peng & Co. is one of the examples of partial change that help them survive through the test of time. In the old days when one thinks of Mee Koo in Penang, Hoe Peng’s buns would be the first to come to mine. They not only churn out their famous Mee Koo but also “Siew Thou” (in Hokkien) or “Longevity Buns”, “Thou Sar Pheah” or “Green Bean Biscuits” and some Chinese folk lore prayer items that are used in Taoist ceremonies.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_176

“Siew Thou” or Longevity Buns

fv-090619-ckc-hoe-peng_32

“Tho Sar Pheah” or Green Bean Biscuit

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_097

Assorted Taoist Ceremonies Prayers Items

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_100

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_105

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_102

As our society, is ever influenced by the western culture and its dining practice, many have forgotten about the versatile Mee Koo. We have forgotten one could the Mee Koo as it is, with butter and kaya, dunk in a cup of hot Kopi ‘O’, made into French toast, or even used as a coating for fish n’ chips (that is my own recipe). Thus, it is due time to give our traditionally unique Mee Koo recognition and respect.

Some weeks ago we were honoured to be given the opportunity to visit and have a peek into the Mee Koo making process at Hoe Peng & Co.’s kitchen. Hoe Peng & Co. was previously located in a corner shop lot just beside “Ong Kongsi” and opposite the once tallest building in Malaysia, Komtar. Currently they have moved to a new location on Lorong Selamat where just opposite the famous “Lorong Selamat Char Koay Teow”. It is now under the umbrella of Cheong Kim Chuan, who has been a household name in Penang and also Malaysia since 1937. They are one of the producers and retailers of our famous and much sort after nutmeg products, “belacan”, “Rojak” sauce, Tambun Biscuit (Tau Sar Pneah) and other traditional Malaysian food and non-food products.

fv-090619-ckc-hoe-peng_01

Our visit started with a tour of their Mee Koo making kitchen where we were introduced to its production executive and food tech, and then we were briefed on the Mee Koo making process. The process from flour to Mee Koo has in all 5 stages, fermenting, kneading, and moulding, proofing and finally steaming. All of these were used to be done by hand, but as technology touch down our shore of Malaysia many years ago, they have converted the mixing and kneading to a mechanical process by introducing mixing, kneading and press machines.

The initial stage of flour mixing and fermenting is a business secret which we did not cover. We begun on the the kneading process, the objective is to churn out dough that has a consistent and equal composition.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_002

After the dough has reached the right consistency, it is then transferred to another machine where the dough is repeatedly passed through rollers to press the dough. This machine compresses the dough so that they reach a specific elasticity before it is sent to the human hands for moulding.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0081

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0181

The common Mee Koo has two layers, the inner one is the main white bun and the outer pink or yellow layer is the skin that encases the white fluffy bun. At Hoe Peng & Co. the outer coloured layer is edible due to the food grade colouring used to churn out the dough.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0331

At Hoe Peng, the tradition of hand moulding of the dough to the specific weight and shape are kept like when it was done many years ago. The dough is hand cut down to size and weighed, wrapped, moulded, and placed on the base paper which also serves as the branding of the Mee Koo.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0271

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0381

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0441

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0501

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_0361

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_053

After the Mee Koo dough is all prepped up, it is placed on a bamboo tray and left to proof or set before they are sent for steaming.  The proofing stage is a important stage where it also determines the texture of the end product. There is set time for proofing, but it mainly relies on the experience nad touch of the food tech to determine the duration required. The uncooked doughs are touch and squeezed to determine the ripeness because due to the ever floating temperature and humidity of our Malaysian climate, the Mee Koo proofing time would fluctuate.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_057

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_055

After the Mee Koo is steamed and cooked, it is place on sale at the counter out side the retail outlet. As you are wondering how do they write the Chinese characters on the Mee Koo for the festive and cultural ceremonies? They are all hand ‘written’ upon request or order. This part of the mee koo is not edible because the dough used in writing the Chinese characters have not been cooked or steamed. They are actually raw dough with added colouring. The process of preparing the coloured dough is also hand-worked to the right texture and elasticity.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_139

All the characters on every Mee Koo are hand ‘written’ using the traditional method that has been used since Hoe Peng & Co. opened it is doors for business years ago. The writing process is very laboured intensive and tedious. Imagine during the festive seasons and hundreds or thousands of orders that require specified Chinese characters to suit the occasion, I pity the person who has to ‘write’ all those characters. But I also admire the person for keeping the tradition alive for our future generations to experience and see.

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_163

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_154

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_1661

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_2001

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_2032

fv-090617-ckc-hoe-peng_2072

Thus, as a Penangite I would like ask my fellow Malaysians regardless of the race and religion to put in support for our heritage products, trades, etc in the form of consuming and patronising them. Give the support in terms business so that they can get to survive the test of time and leave a piece of history, culture and character for our future generation that they will be proud of. Heritage is not only in the form of buildings and artefacts, but also the way of life, cuisines that were savoured by our forefathers, etc.

fv-090709-hoe-peng_1

View Georgetown Food in a larger map

Share

Penang Street Food-Cruellers Extra!!!

Posted by Jason Wong On May - 14 - 200912 COMMENTS

After picking up Gill from her friends’ at the foot hill of Penang Hill, she was nagging me to go to Paya Terubong to try out the extra long crullers that we read in the bloggs. Thus, with all that ‘cute faces’ showing how could I not go, especially when we seldom come along to Air Itam area without any intentions or business. Actually, I used to live near by the Air Itam area, just a stones’ throw from  here in Jalan Padang Tembak.  Those days coming to Air Itam was easy and fast with my motorbike, now it seems to take ages especially with all the inconsiderate drivers who park as they please and choke up the road. Driving through this area is at time frustrating!

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_110

A cruller in western context  is a fried pastry made of dough which may resemble  the shape of a doughnut or twister sticks with some cake characteristics. Crullers are often topped with powdered sugar or icing, but now-a-days with more sinful ingredients. Traditional crullers were being made and sold at Dunkin’ Donuts, not until 2003 when they decided to stop these delicacies due to the labour-intensive nature of the process.

In this part of the globe, crullers are almost the same as those found on the western hemisphere except that they are coated nor topped with any other ingredients.  Chinese crullers or commonly known as ‘you tiao’ are sticks of dough deep fried till goldenly crisp, with the inners of the ‘you tiao’ should still retaining some softness. Last Sunday, after reviewing the Ivy’s Kitchen and after picking Gill up at her friends’, we went to this road side stall along the main road of Paya Terubong in search of the not-so-well-known ‘Te Chang You Tiao’ or extra long crullers.

The ‘Te Chang You Tiao’ stall is manned by Mr. Tan junior and his pretty efficient workers. Over here one could get a glimpse of how the traditional Chinese crullers are made. It all starts with a batch of dough which is then separated into smaller batches or blocks. Then the dough is left to sit or rise before they are prep for the fryer.  What is so special of the crullers stall is that they produce extra long golden crisp cruller sticks which are around 14 to 15 inch. The normal Chinese crullers in town are half the length of Tan’s crullers.

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_003

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_012

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_017

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_023

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_024

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_034

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_041

Other than producing traditional Chinese cruller sticks with the dough, they also churn our butterfly crullers or ‘hua chi’. In some places, this butterfly crullers are also known as horse feet or ‘mah kiauk’ in Cantonese. The dough is cut to shorter lengths and coated with sugar paste and knot together at the centre which after frying would look like a butter fly. At this stall the butter fly crullers are not only coated with sugar paste, they are also given an extra fragrant and taste of black and white sesame seeds. Even the knotting also differs from others, with it placed at the top rather at the centre.

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_051

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_056

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_064

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_068

The butterfly crullers or what Tan calls is, twins crullers, were not exceptionally sweet and were fluffily soft. With the sesame seeds, it had that nutty fragrant which was quite attractive in my point of view.

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_088

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_093

Other that enjoying the traditional Chinese cruller straight up, in a bowl of piping hot porridge, or dunk in a cup of aromatic kopi ‘o’ (Hainanese coffee), now one could also savour the crullers with trendy fillings like kaya(coconut jam) and butter, honey and butter, peanut butter, pork floss and mayo, or tuna salad.

With the added kaya and butter, the taste experience of this traditional snack turn from fatty and savoury to sweet and rich.

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_109

The tuna salad filling with lots of chopped cabbage, carrot and onion gave the other wise plain cruller a refreshing feeling and some crunchy texture. With mayonnaise, who would not like this snack?!

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_104

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_083

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_082
fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_084

 

Average Rating for this place:

* 4.2/5 for value (size 2 times longer then the ordinary yet is just RM1, very reasonable)
* 3.8/5 for taste & texture (texture something like ham cim peng, different from the normal)
* 3.8/5 for service (friendly service)
* 4.0/5 for cleanliness (it was fly season)
* 3.0/5 for atmosphere (road side mah!)

Te Chang You Tiao Wang Enterprise

1250-A, Jalan Paya Terubong, 11600 Penang, Malaysia.

+60 (16) 4337301

Daily from 1:00pm~8:30pm. Closed on Alternate Tuesdays.

fv-090503-te-chang-you-tiao_001

View Ayer Itam Food in a larger map

Share

Home-made Poon Choy

Posted by Jason Wong On January - 31 - 200913 COMMENTS
A few months back we posted some photos of our Poon Choy, and now I am posting the process of building the Poon Choy with the various ingredients used. All ingredients are fresh because they were vacuum sealed, I found my vacuum sealer from vacuumsealerresearch.com.
All ingridients already cooked on the table waiting to be combined to build our Poon Choy.

All ingredients already cooked on the table waiting to be combined to build our Poon Choy.

White redish.

Blench radish.

The stewed bean curd skin forms the second layer of the Poon Choy. The first is the white redish.

Braised bean curd skin.

Stewed pork skin

Stewed pork skin

Steamed pork patties.

Steamed pork patties.

Stewed sea cucumber.

Braised sea cucumber.

'San Sin Kai' or liquer chicken.

'San Sin Kai' or liquor chicken.

Bought roast duck.

Bought roast duck.

Deep fried prawns with salt. Remember to use fresh prawns so that it would have that fishy smell.

Deep fried prawns with salt. Remember to use fresh prawns so that it would have that fishy smell.

Stewed shitaki mushroom.

Braised shitaki mushroom.

Blench brocoli.

Blench broccoli.

Gill is getting ready for the building of the Poon Choy.

Gill is getting ready for the building of the Poon Choy.

The base layers are the white raddish and stewed bean curd skin.

The base layers are the radish and braised bean curd skin.

The third layer is the the pre-cooked pork skin.

The third layer is the the pre-cooked pork skin.

The fourth layer consist of the specially cooked pork in bean paste, which has a very heavy taste. The previous layers do not contain much taste, their job is to absorb all the taste from the top layers.

The fourth layer consist of the specially braised pork in bean paste, which has a very heavy taste. The previous layers do not contain much flavor, their job is to absorb all the taste from the braised pork.

On top of the stewed pork layer are the layers of san sin kai, roast duck, steam pork, deep fried prawns and steam pork. Then on top of those, we placed the mushrooms and broccolies.

On top of the braised pork layer are the layers of chicken - san sin kai, roast duck, steam pork pattie, deep fried prawns and sea cucumber and mushroom. Broccolies as part of decor & green.

This is the end product of the day's hard work of preparing and cooking the layers of delicious ingridients.

This is the end product of the day's hard work of preparing and cooking the layers of delicious ingredients.

Share

Young Hearts’ Restaurant Invited Review

Posted by Jason Wong On January - 13 - 200912 COMMENTS
A few weeks ago we were belated by a call from CK about an invited review from Young Hearts. We have actually drove by this place a few times, but did not have the urge to visit or try out the food there. Actually, our first impression of this place was that it was an art studio or chinese tea house from the exterior.
This invite actually brought more inside of this place to us. The concept, idea, history and passion this place was quite interesting to us. This place actually serves food that have been in one of the partners family recipes. Ann Kee, the working partner of this place gave us a brief run though about Young Hearts and its conception and passion to serve home cooked meals and food to its patrons.
The invited review was mainly for us Penang Food Bloggers to try and taste the new menu that they will make available for the coming Chinese Lunar New Year. Our feedbacks and comments were also sort to assist to gauge on the taste and texture of the dishes. Ann was quite receptive to our suggestions and ideas, which is scarce value in most of the food business owners. In fact, she took the time to sit in with us and ate and taste every dish that was served. I would hope that we could see more of this kind of humble and open minded food business owners.
Young Hearts is located near the Junction of Cantonment Road and .
Young Hearts is located on Cantonment Road.
The Sweet Heart Hoya plant was the inspiration for the name of this restaurant.
The Sweet Heart Hoya plant was the inspiration for the name of this restaurant. The concepts of the Young Heart Restaurant is to cook from the passion of the heart with healthy living concern. This is very important to chefs, which most of them are lacking of.
Another type of Sweet Heart Hoya plant which is harder to maintain.
Another type of Sweet Heart Hoya plant which is harder to maintain.
There are some parking lots in their premises.
There are some parking lots in their premises.
Unagi veger roll & Egg vege roll.
Here comes the starter, Unagi veger roll & Egg vege roll.
Poached prawn vege roll.
Poached prawn vege roll. The rolls were served cold and were best taken with accompanying dipping sauce. The rolls are something healthy to begin a meal as they had a lot of vegetables. It reminds me of the rolls we had at Miss Saigon last year.
The dipping sauce that is a condiment to the various types of vege rolls. There are Japanese style with sesame seeds, Chinese style with garlic and vinegar, and lastly Thai style chilllie.
The dipping sauce that is a condiment to the various types of vege rolls. There are Japanese style with sesame seeds, Chinese style with garlic and vinegar, and lastly Thai style chilllie.
Pickled lotus root in sugar and vinegar.
Pickled lotus root in sugar and apple cider vinegar.
Hot and sour soup was something that we needed to kick start the appertite.
Hot and sour soup was something like sichuan soup, to kick start the appetite.
Surprisingly the soup stayed thick, even hours later it was still thick and have not not turn watery. I guess they might have used wheat flour to thicken the soup.
Surprisingly the soup stayed thick, even hours later it was still thick and have not not turn watery. I guess they might have used wheat flour to thicken the soup?
Various dumplings were served.
There were various dumplings were served, but I was busy moving around taking photographs that I could not remember the taste and texture of the dumplings. May be a more detail description of the dumpling could be found in the blogs of those bloggers who attended.
At Young Heart, one could also order Goutie or wor Tip other than the usual dumblings. It is actually pan fried dumblings with some variation to the skin.
At Young Heart, one could also order Goutie or wor Tip other than the usual dumblings. It is actually pan fried dumblings with some variation to the skin.
Chicken and Cheese Goutie was an innovation to the common goutie. But to the texture did not came up to my expectations, thus I suggested to them to add mozzalle cheese to give it the goowy texture and parmesan for taste.
Chicken and Cheese Goutie was an innovation to the common goutie.  Combination of the Goutie quite fine, but to the texture did not came up to my expectations, thus I suggested to them to add mozzalle cheese to give it the goowy texture and parmesan for taste.
Prawn and Leak filling was juicy and tender, but the skin for the Goutie was slightly thicker than what I expected.
Prawn and Leak filling was juicy and tender, but the skin for the Goutie was slightly thicker than what I expected.
Deep fried bean curd was crispy on the surface and soft on the in side.
Deep fried bean curd was crispy on the surface and firm on the inside.
The bean curd or taufu had some ingredients mixed in to it.
The bean curd or taufu had some ingredients have the mixture of toufu, fish, carrot, corriander to it. The portion of the taufu mixture was just right. (Highly Recommended)
This is a tray of chilled bean curd before being deep fried in batter.
This is a tray of chilled bean curd before being deep fried in batter.
Prosperous Year In Malaysia in short deep fried chicken wing with lemon grass.
Prosperous Year In Malaysia in short deep fried chicken wing with onion, lemon grass and kaffir lime leaf.
The wings were fried til golden colour. The meat were juicy and moist, and the skin, which is favourite, was crsip and fragrant.
The wings were fried till golden colour. The meat were juicy and moist, and the skin, which is favoufull, was crispy and fragrant. Long time didnt had such a high standard fried chicken, Thumbs up! (Highly Recommended)
Deep fried garlic prawns. I had mine whole, head, shell, meat and tail.
Deep fried garlic prawns. I had mine whole, head, shell, meat and tail.
The deep fried garlic prawns were something different from the the normal cereal or butter prawns. The prawns were crispy on the surface and yet juicy and tender in the inside, but the downs side was that the batter was a little too salty for me.
The deep fried garlic prawns were something different from the the normal cereal or butter prawns which you can easily find in anywhere of local restaurant. The prawns were crispy on the surface and yet juicy, firm (very fresh) in the inside, but the batter was a little too salty for me. Over all still good to me. (Highly Recommended)
Stuffed sponge gourd in 'tongkui' sauce.
Stuffed sponge gourd in ‘dong guai’ or angelica sinensis sauce. The moment this dish was served, I could smell the aroma of the dong guai. And the sauce or soup was light and sweet which went well with plain blend tasting stuffed sponge gourd. The sponge gourd in cantonese we refer it as ‘zuk sang’ which is translated to bamboo skin.
This is the stuffed sponge gourd that we had. When I was in he kitchen it seem to appear bigger. The meat was smooth and the sponge gourd gave it the rought texture that it needed. Taste wise it was blend, it was actually the sauce that gave it that special taste.
This is the stuffed sponge gourd that we had. When I was in he kitchen it seem to appear bigger, I guessed the cooking has made it shrink. The meat was smooth and the sponge gourd gave it the rought texture that it needed. Taste wise it was blend, it was actually the sauce/soup that gave it that special taste.
Steam stuffed snake squash drench with egg, corn and crab stick sauce. The stuffed pieces of squash were steam to tilled and then the suace was prepared and drench over it. It was a light and sweet dish. So light that one could even taste the distinct taste of the corn, crab stick and egg used.
Steam stuffed snake squash drench with egg, corn and crab stick sauce. The stuffed pieces of squash were steam to tilled and then the sauce was prepared and drench over it. It was a light and sweet dish. So light that one could even taste the distinct taste of the corn, crab stick and egg used.
This is how an snake squash looks like if broken in to halves.
This is how an snake squash looks like if broken in to halves.
We were also served a serving of steam cod fish. The fish was steam to just the right level of cookness and consistency. The dressing was also a compliment to the rich, creamy and soft cod fish meat. The soya sauce dressing did not overwhelm the fish in any way, but it was not a good idea to ask for white rice. The sauce did not went down well with rice, it made me feel dull.
We were also served a serving of steam cod fish with taufu, granished with fried crispy julienne ginger. The fish was steam to just the right level and consistency. The dressing was also a compliment to the rich, creamy and soft cod fish meat. Suprisingly it was not oily at all. The soya sauce dressing did not overwhelm the fish. The chef managed the dish well and even you can taste the natural of the toufu flavour. Anyway, it was not a good idea to ask for white rice as the sauce did not went down well with rice because the sauce was prepared light to not affect the taste and texture of the Cod fish. (Highly Recommended)
Black Jelly Mushroom Noodle is actually black fungus noodles. The fungus used was of good grade as it was thick and crunchy. The usual black fungus found at other restaurants are normally thin and has lesser body. This bowl of noodle was full of the sweetness from the various vegetables utilised to prepare it. On a personal note, we would like to substitute the purpale cabbage with 'kau choy fah' due to te bitterness and colour of the cabbage.
Black Jelly Mushroom Noodle is actually black fungus noodles. The fungus used was of good grade as it was thick and crunchy. The usual black fungus found at other restaurants are normally thin and has lesser body. This bowl of noodle was full of the sweetness from the various vegetables utilised to prepare it. On a personal note, we would like to substitute the purpul cabbage with ‘kau choy fah’ (in cantonese) due to te bitterness and colour of the cabbage.

Their noodles usually freshly made everday, and you can find their noodle is more springier compare to others.  It’s one of their in house specialty

Minced Pork Noodles or 'Jar Kiang Mian' is sweet and full of the stewed pork fragrant and taste. But the minced pork was slightly dry and rough on the mouth.
Minced Pork Noodles or ‘Jar Jiang Mian’ give the sweet and full of the stewed pork fragrant and taste to it. But the minced pork itself was slightly rough on the mouth.
Last on the menu for the night was thier Mince Pork and Spicy Bean Noodle.
Last on the menu for the night was thier Mince Pork and Spicy Bean Noodle.
Minced pork with spicy bean noodle was not favourite, not because it was not nice, it is just that I do not how to appreciate this dish.
Minced pork with spicy bean noodle was not my favourite, not because it was not nice, it is just that I do not how to appreciate this dish. The noodle was very spicy, but he spiciness does not linger in the mouth. Therefore, one need not worry about the heat of the spicy bean paste.

For drinks we had Honey Lemon with Aloe Vera & Chrysanthemum Tea. The Aloevera was freshly peel from their restaurant’s garden. Its truly gaints my heart – fresh from the garden.

The Chrysanthemum Tea infused with Chamomile, no wonder it tasted different fromt the ordinary Chrysanthemum Tea.

After we had all the above items, and we reliase and understand, they really cooked from the heart and should praise the passion that they have.

Other than wanting to serve home cook meals and food to its patrons, they have also decorated their premises plants and made it as homey as possible.

fv-090106-young-hearts-room-decofv-090106-young-hearts-room-deco2fv-090106-young-hearts-21

Address: 44A, Jalan Cantonment, 10350

Penang, Malaysia.
Opening Hours: 12.00noon-10.00pm (Closed Monday)
Contact: 604-228 8084, 016-410 8098 (Ms. Ann Kee)


On average, I would give this place:

  • 3.8/5 for value
  • 3.8/5 for taste & texture
  • 4.5/5 for service
  • 4.5/5 for cleanliness
  • 4/5 for atmosphere

Other bloggers that were also invited by CK were:

  1. Penang Tua Pui
  2. Heanenly Allie
  3. Food Paradise
  4. Steven Goh
  5. Cariso Delicacies
  6. Criz
  7. Allen Ooi
  8. Buzzing Bee


View Larger Map

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Share